Milano Cookies Recipe (2024)

Published: · Modified: by Amanda Powell · This post may contain affiliate links.

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Sure, the store-bought stuff is good, but nothing beats homemade milano cookies! Impress everyone during your cookie exchange this year. Easily customize the flavors with this easy to follow milano cookies recipe.

Milano Cookies Recipe (1)

If I had to name one cookie as the ultimate "adulting" cookie, it would be the Milano. Growing up, I always considered it to be a cookie that only grown-ups can enjoy, and it was out of bounds for someone my age.

As I grew up and had money of my own, I still shied away from Milanos, thinking they were for someone who was more responsible. The type of cookie you eat when you have your own house and car. It took me a while until I actually realized I was both being silly and also worthy of this cookie.

I think this pretty much sums up my adolescence.

Milano Cookies Recipe (2)

Are Milano Cookies Italian?

Technically, no. The cookies were actually created by Pepperidge Farms in 1956. That being said, the cookie is based on Italian-style cookies.

Are Milano Cookies Soft?

Milano cookies are light, buttery, crisp cookies that sandwich a rich, velvety chocolate ganache. They are far from soft, and make wonderful cookies to dip in a glass of ice-cold milk or your coffee because they can retain their structure well.

Milano Cookies Recipe (3)

Can You Freeze Milano Cookies?

Absolutely! I love freezing them. They do get a little softer when thawed, but I don't mind that. If you want to keep your cookies crisp, I would refrain from freezing them. Honestly, I do enjoy eating them while they are still mostly frozen.

Are Milano Cookies Gluten-Free

No, they are not gluten-free, but you can easily make it so by using a 1:1 gluten-free baking mix. I recommend using King Arthur Flour and Bob's Red Mill.

Milano Cookies Recipe (4)

Want to Bake More Cookies?

If you want more cookies, try my double chocolate cookies or my cinnamon roll cookies! You may also enjoy my German thumbprint cookies and my s'mores stuffed cookies. My coconut chocolate chip cookies are a reader favorite. If you'd like to be more adventurous, try something like my edible sugar cookie dough!

Recipe Card

Milano Cookies Recipe (5)

Milano Cookie Recipe

Amanda Powell

These delicious milano cookies taste even better than the real thing!

Print Recipe Pin Recipe

Prep Time 18 minutes mins

Cook Time 14 minutes mins

Total Time 32 minutes mins

Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 8 tablespoons unsalted butter room temperature
  • 1 ¼ cups powdered sugar
  • 1 large egg white room temperature
  • 1 large egg room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter melted and cooled

Ganache

  • 1 ¼ cups chopped dark chocolate
  • cup heavy cream
  • mint extract optional

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line two baking sheet with parchment paper.

  • Mix together the flour and salt. Set aside.

  • Cream the butter and powdered sugar together until light. Beat in the eggs well Add in the vanilla and the melted butter and mix until well combined. Add in the flour mixture and mix until just combined.

  • Fit a piping bag with a large ½" round piping tip and fill with the cookie dough.

  • Pipe 2-inch lines of dough two inches apart on the parchment paper. Bake for 9 - 10 minutes, or until the edges are golden brown.

  • Turn off the heat and crack open the oven, and leave the cookies there to crisp for about 10 - 20 minutes, keeping an eye on them so they don't get too dark at the edges.

  • Allow to cool completely.

  • While the cookies are baking, heat the chocolate and heavy cream over a double boiler until smooth. Allow to cool completely.

  • Drop a teaspoon of the ganache onto half the cookies and top with the other half of the cookies. The ganache will harden over time.

  • Store in an airtight container for up to 5 days.

Notes

If you want to make mint milanos, add a couple of drops of mint extract to your heavy cream before making the filling!

Nutrition

Serving: 1cookieCalories: 169kcalCarbohydrates: 18gProtein: 2gFat: 10gSaturated Fat: 6gPolyunsaturated Fat: 3gCholesterol: 32mgSodium: 55mgFiber: 1gSugar: 11g

Keyword chocolate, ganache, milano, milano cookies

Tried this recipe?Tag me on Instagram! @acookienameddesire #acookienameddesire


More Cookie Recipes

  • Espresso Chocolate Chip Cookies
  • Gooey Butter Cookies
  • Lemon Bar Cookies

About Amanda Powell

Baker, photographer, and sometimes world traveler behind A Cookie Named Desire. Obsessed with helping people live life sweetly with delicious food to share with the special people in your life and creating lasting memories.

Reader Interactions

Comments

  1. sam says

    Finally!

    A recipe from the internet that actually works!
    The cookies were perfect, like "lengua de gato".

    Make sure you leave room, as these spread. They are actually thinner than the regular milanos, that suits me just fine.

    And like others, it made about twice the ganache as needed, so I halved it, and it was perfect.

    I will add that the ganache is perfect for cookies, with a 1:2 cream-to-chocolate ratio (other recipes online do 1:1, that's for cake).

    I will try orange milanos, next time.

    Thanks so much!Milano Cookies Recipe (10)

    Reply

  2. Tammy says

    Can you please tell me how many cookies this recipe makes? I am going to make them for a group of people at my Church!
    Thank you for sharing your recipe.

    Reply

    • Tammy says

      Forgot, can I use milk chocolate instead of dark Chocolate?

      Reply

  3. Laura Walsh says

    Great idea for a cookie. Could you post a photo of the piped cookie before it is baked? Pictures help me to understand your recipe instrutions better.

    Reply

    • Amanda Powell says

      If it would be helpful. I can add this recipe to my list to make a video of me making it, plus create process photos.

      Reply

      • Emily says

        YES PLEASE

  4. Terri says

    Is it possible to make these gluten free and egg free?

    Reply

    • Amanda Powell says

      You can replace the flour with a gluten-free baking mix. I do not think you can make the recipe egg-free though as I have never tried, sorry!

      Reply

      • Dairy free lady says

        I think you should be able to replace the egg with aquafaba. That is what I was going to try (but with the gluten).

  5. Rosanne says

    How do you get your cookies to have that perfect shape with the rounded edges!

    Reply

    • Amanda Powell says

      It really takes practice with the piping. Keep your piping bag directly above the baking sheet and apply a light pressure. Toward the bottom, release the pressure, and bring your hand back up the piped cookie just slightly. Practice makes perfect! I have a double chocolate version coming in my cookbook, so be sure to look out for those!

      Reply

  6. Jenae says

    Delicious recipe! But the amount of ganache was wayyy too much for the number of cookies it made. I had more than half a cup of chocolate ganache leftover after filling all the cookies.

    Reply

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Milano Cookies Recipe (2024)

FAQs

What are the ingredients in Milano cookies? ›

MADE FROM: ENRICHED WHEAT FLOUR (FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), SEMI SWEET CHOCOLATE (SUGAR, CHOCOLATE, CHOCOLATE PROCESSED WITH ALKALI, COCOA BUTTER, MILKFAT, SOY LECITHIN, VANILLA EXTRACT), SUGAR, VEGETABLE OILS (PALM AND/OR SOYBEAN AND HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN), EGGS, ...

What is the difference between Milano and Monaco cookies? ›

Each cookie consists of a thin layer of chocolate sandwiched between two biscuit cookies. The cookie is marketed as the Monaco in Canada; local company Milano Bakeries had established prior rights to the "Milano" brand for cookies sold in that country.

Are Milano cookies from Italy? ›

No, Milano cookies were created in the 1950s as part of Pepperidge Farms' European collection. It started off as the Naples, a flat vanilla cookie which, like the Italian city itself, had a dark side — this one made of chocolate.

What is Milano made of? ›

INDULGENT COOKIE: The perfect balance of luxuriously rich dark chocolate sandwiched between two deliciously exquisite cookies. QUALITY INGREDIENTS: Our delicious cookies are made from select ingredients like enriched wheat flour, semi-sweet chocolate, sugar, vanilla extract, and eggs.

Why are Milano cookies so good? ›

We think that's because slightly bitter dark chocolate marries so well with a sweet butter cookie. In the traditional dark chocolate Milanos, you get a wafer-thin layer of deep dark chocolate. “These are both rich and light,” says Shannon. “You get richness from the chocolate and lightness from the cookie.”

Why are Milano cookies called Monaco? ›

Milano is the Italian name for the Italian city of the same name. Canadians will see the Monaco cookie on store shelves due to a naming conflict with another local Italian cookie brand.

What is the new Milano cookie flavor? ›

Pepperidge Farm Launching New Milano London Fog

The cookie is inspired by the fan-loved latte, which is made with Earl Grey tea, vanilla, and milk. The new Milano combines the Earl Grey and vanilla flavors of the tea-based drink with the cookie you already love.

Are Milano cookies soft or hard? ›

Pepperidge Farm Mint Milano Cookies

They are truly magical. My favorite as a kid was definitely the mint varietal. But then I started to think about them in this super analytical way and I realized they're sort of just like shortbread cookies but softer.

Do Milano cookies have eggs? ›

CONTAINS: EGG, WHEAT, MILK, SOY.

Why is there a shortage of Milano cookies? ›

The issue comes from a combination of labor shortages and elevated demand for products. Certain Pepperidge Farm cookies—like Milano, Chessman, Linzer, and Bordeaux—might see such shortages due to their particular shapes and textures, as the company doesn't use third-party manufacturers to make them.

What is the most famous dessert in Italy? ›

Perhaps the most iconic Italian dessert, tiramisu appears on menus at restaurants not only throughout Italy but also all over the world.

Do Milano cookies go bad? ›

Milano cookies are usually best consumed by the best before date on the package. However, if stored properly in a cool, dry place, they can last a couple of weeks beyond that date, though their quality may begin to decline.

What is so special about Milano? ›

Milan is a major cultural centre, with museums and art galleries that include some of the most important collections in the world, such as major works by Leonardo da Vinci.

Are Milano cookies healthy? ›

Milano cookies feel like an upscale treat, but a serving of these milk chocolate cookies serves up over a quarter of your daily recommended intake of added sugars. No, thank you! RELATED: The Best & Worst Chips in 2021—Ranked!

Where are Pepperidge Farm Milano cookies made? ›

4. Must make more Milano cookies! To meet rising demand, in May of 2021 we announced the addition of a new production line at our Denver, Pennsylvania bakery. It more than doubles the number of cookies the bakery makes per minute!

What are the ingredients in Pepperidge Farm cookies? ›

MADE FROM: ENRICHED WHEAT FLOUR (FLOUR, NIACIN, REDUCED IRON, THIAMINE MONONITRATE, RIBOFLAVIN, FOLIC ACID), MILK CHOCOLATE (SUGAR, COCOA BUTTER, SKIM MILK, CHOCOLATE, MILKFAT, DEXTROSE, SOY LECITHIN, VANILLA EXTRACT), FRUCTOSE, VEGETABLE OILS (PALM AND/OR SOYBEAN AND HYDROGENATED SOYBEAN), BROWN SUGAR (SUGAR, INVERT ...

What are the ingredients in Milano lady fingers? ›

Enriched Wheat Flour (niacin, Benzoyl Peroxide, Reduced Iron, Ascorbic Acid, Thiamine Mononitrate, Azodicarbonamide, Riboflavin, Amylase, Folic Acid), Sugar, Water, Canola Oil, Whole Eggs, Modified Milk Ingredients, Salt, Baking Powder, Ammonium Bicarbonate, Sodium Propionate Flavour (ethyl Alcohol, Propylene Glycol, ...

What is the original Milano? ›

Warm temperatures + melting chocolate = the creation of the Milano cookies! Pepperidge Farm introduced the Naples cookie in 1956, an open-faced cookie with chocolate on top—but the chocolate was melting in warmer temperatures. The fix? Add a second cookie like a sandwich. And in 1957, the Milano was born.

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